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of the economic downturn, the education in our country have had their budgets dropped. it makes it challenging, most would say come to believe that our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field on around the world because of bigger class sizes, fewer books, less time with quality teachers. how would you improve education? mr. smith, you would suggest eliminating the department of indication altogether. is that the right plan for this moment? -- the department of education altogether. >> the best way to educate our students is at the state level. that is between the local school board, teachers, and parents. i said i would take a look at the department of education, and it's possible, but they do some good things. we do not want to throw it away, but we need -- any federal organization, especially as big as the department of education, there's a lot of waste in there. give that money to the states. they can do it themselves. that's a state issue. it would be more economical doing it that way. we need to eliminate a lot of mandates from the department of education. i don'
, but for those who make a million dollars or more. making the investments in education, making the investments in research, and we make those investments together and build a future. that is what it will take over the long run to build a stronger future here in western massachusetts, all across the commonwealth, and all across the country. >> thank you. before i start, i want to thank the mayor for your endorsement and support. thank you both for coming. this is actually about jobs and economy. the whole race is about that. we held one of our first jobs fares here because we want to connect people with jobs. when you put a title on a bill in washington that says jobs bill, you have to read the bill. those bills in particular were rejected in a bipartisan manner, and that means democrats and republicans recognize that by taking for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, thank you for coming
of the economic downturn, the education in our country has had to squeeze from every angle, city budgets for education have dropped, state budgets have dropped, so it makes it challenging most experts would say to believe our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field with other students around the world because the bigger class size is now and less time with quality teachers. how would you improve education first of all and in fact mr. smith you suggested eliminating the department of education altogether. is that the right plan at this moment? casey: the best place is that the state level. that is where between the local school boards, teachers and parents. now i don't -- i said i wanted to take a look at the department of education, and it's possible. but they do some good things so we don't want to throw that away. but we need -- any federal organizations basically as big as the department of education there is a lot waste. just to get that money to the states. they can do it themselves and that is a state issue but it would be more economical doing that. and w
's. rather than just putting one person on education to try to gobble that entire fire hose that comes at them, they can add narratives and subtract them, make sure people are involved. if they are not enrolled in those narratives, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question -- i am not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north county times" -- the assets are collapsing in value. they bought it for $12 million, sold h
the distractions, and listen and learn and read and question more about who is really benefiting and educating ourselves on how we got here and figure out how each of us can make a positive impact, that's the way to change the system. knowledge sharing, truth-seeking, open debate, fresh ideas, and discovering a common ground among each other. no matter what your political persuasion, we are the critical time in our nation's history. it's time to take our country back from the private interests who control our beliefs, our opinions and our lives. [cheers and applause] thank you very much for joining us tonight. our moderator this evening is award-winning broadcaster and media personality larry king. [cheers and applause] >> don't, don't. >> his new online home is aura tv and he is the host of "larry king now." welcome larry. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. and welcome everybody. i'm very happy to be doing this. i think all voices should be heard. a few notes about the format for tonight's debate, really easy job for me because it's a rather simple format. each candidate will have an opportu
has got better jobs plan, and better record, and a better budget plan, a better education plan, at a better health care plan than governor romney. if you listen to all the debates, the republican arguments come down to the. -- to this. we left him a terrible mess and in 4 years he did not fix it. we have finally discovered that middle-class people are having a hard time. put us back again. we will do the same thing we did before. that is basically the argument. look at this. i hope i have earned some credibility with you. [cheers and applause] on jobs and budgets. do you believe our country works better when we are all together or when your on your own? do you believe our economy works better when we share prosperity in response ability or whether we just keep the money at the top and help it trickles down? -- hope it trickles down? do you believe our policies are better when we make them based on evidence or extremist ideology? do you believe our budget are better women for them based on an arithmetic or illusion? barack obama as a senator ran for president for nearly two year
education in missouri? especially given the educational choices you have made for your own children. i am referring to your decision to home school your children and senator mccaskill's to send at least one of her children to private catholic schools. >> thank you for that question. all of us understand that education is critical. one of the things we have in america is something called the freedom. people can choose to educate the way that they want. we need to preserve that freedom. one of the things i have done that not another congressman in missouri has done is to vote no on no children left behind. i do not have abiding faith in the government to fix problems in education. even though it was my president who offer the bill, i told them no. i do not think all of the red tape in washington, d.c. helps our schools. i was willing to stand on the basis of principle the education needs to be local. what makes the best education is when you have a mom and dad that loves their kid and puts a high priority on education. with that kind of formula, education can work well for people. i support
-centric for something in the future. to me, both of those reasons focus on this time of investing in education and development of future capabilities, tactics, techniques, and procedures. we have to invest in that going forward. >> could i do a short follow-up? what does that approach imply for the army civilians and contractors? do they become diminished? >> they might in terms of numbers, but it will still play a role. >> and how do you incorporate the planning of what those numbers need to be, particularly on the contractor side? >> you want to have the right balance. again, contractors provide us with its unique capabilities that we simply do not have. that is what they will focus on. we have department of army civilians that will provide continuity and consistency that we need. then you need our military members in order to provide us with experience, expertise, and frankly sometimes, just the validity of what we are trying to do based on their experiences. that is where and try to capture the right mix. right now, it is overbalanced toward contractors and civilians. i'm trying to rebalan
develop its domestic rail infrastructure and matured through training and education and managing that rail system through the creation of a career in transportation. think about growing saudi arabia and talent and not hiring saudi arabians. many are aggressive in seeking out saudi arabian students for some programs. now, as they graduate, we will bring them on for training within the company. with the intent of starting them out in entry-level managers and engineers in the kingdom. they are starting a career. not just being hired on for a job. they did all this. they beat the competition. they won. other american companies are making a significant impact. not just on their businesses, but also on the future of saudi arabia. exxon mobil has a long tradition in the kingdom. among their success is a huge refinery about two hours north of a main city. the refinery has 92% saudi arabian employees. stretching all the way from management to blue-collar employees. exxon mobil was into saudia station before saudia station was required. we anticipate this to the same degree of the new refinery that
. nobody else can do this to the extent we can. we have very sharp people, well-educated, well schooled and trained particularly in the medical profession's to make a difference on things. and we have this ongoing research and development as background to make us all better at doing these things. so, these are the basics, and one of the things we would like to draw out today is what else is there that we should understand, what else can we do, how can we take these attributes and capabilities and maybe make them better? i won't want to monopolize all the time, but i would like to throw my desire on the table, and that is it's been a great honor, and i have to admit an eye opener at first to go around the world to places that are certainly less privileged than we are and to see the dedicated efforts of so many people not just from this country but many other countries who are trying to make a difference in places that need help with is a medical area or general health and welfare of people advancing their education, let in this venue the fundamental security, personal security through be
, better education plan, than his opponent, gov. romney. if you listen to all those debates -- the republican argument comes down to, we left him a terrible mess, and in four years he didn't fix it. we discovered middle class people are having a hard time. so take him out and put ius back in and we'll do what we did before on steriods. that is the argument. let's loo ak at this. i hope i've earned some credibility with you. on jobs and budgets. first thing we have to decide is, do you believe the country works better when we're all in this together or when you're on your own. do you believe the economy works better with shared responsibility or we give all the money to the top and hope it trickles down? or that our policies are better based on evidence or extremeist idiology. onwhe nwe base them oour budges illusion?tic or first of all, let's start with the facts. obama ran for president for two years, including the secretary of state and joe biden. they all thought what they were doing was offering specific solutions. to change the courst of a weak economy. before the meltd
. but other benefits are also important such as childcare, education and employment services, cash assistance, energy assistance. and others, housing and others, wic, school meals can also be included in the package. the technology that is available, the cloud, the enterprise architecture, the rules engine can unlearning all these terms, it makes it possible. it really expands the degree to which information can be shared and things can be streamlined. but the policies and procedures and how human beings interact with those systems behind the scenes and in front of the scenes, it's also very important. i do think there is a one size fits all kind of approach. the states along with local communities and the federal government with input from others need to figure out how a coherent vision to be made to package all these benefits together. right now in most states people who applied to the human services door are able to access health benefits. especially lowest income families. but there's a risk i think under health care reform that as states, states may split sort of the health, health peace
for us to make sure we are investing in the education and development of future capabilities and techniques and procedures. we've got to invest in that as we go forward. >> got into a short short follow-up on the? what does that approach apply -- apply for both contractors or? they become diminished. >> i mean, i think potentially they might ask little bit spent in terms of numbers spent in terms of numbers, but they will still play a role. they are not a limited at all spent how do you incorporate into planning what those numbers need to be? u.. >> based on their experiences. so i think that's what we're trying to capture is that right mix. what i'm saying right now is it's overbalanced. i'm trying to rebalance it again. >> got it. nate? >> yes, sir. there's a lot of discussion so far about what we want to do and can do. what are some of the areas specifically that you think that the army going forward can assume more risk in capability and competencies as we sort of deal with an era of declining or plateauing resources? >> yeah. i mean, i think it's not, i think risk and ca
taken jobs and they're not using their educational background or their training. the food stamp number show how tough the economy is. 17% on food stamps. i'm glad we have unemployment programs and food stamp programs and i'm glad we have a number of companies that have come to delaware. we have not done enough. we have to much burdensome regulation. we still raised taxes during this recession which we drove back. personal income tax and we need to create a stable business environment. we have not done a good enough job creating that environment and that is borne out by the numbers. >> where do you stand on your blueprint for delaware? >> we have implemented the majority of items in their and we have more to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to create a delaware version of a cops bill. we have made progress there as well. it is not spin to the hundreds of workers were back at the refinery. it is not spin to the people who decided to expand in delaware. it is not spin to the folks at foxfire printing who are adding dozens of jobs. it is not spin to the peopl
program, clear-cut ways to improve education. >> joe, i remember a couple of years ago -- >> i do it every year. >> but a series of wonderful articles, before the midterm for "time" magazine. you talked over a lot of the midwest, middle class. and you found that the -- china came up ten times as often as afghanistan -- >> 20. >> 20 types as often as afghanistan. when you look at the -- what an average middle-class american family is facing, particularly kind of people who work in factories, they're up against probably a generation of this kind of wage competition and -- possibly wage deflation because of china, things. do you -- what do you think happens to the politics of america if that middle class is not appreciably better five, six, eight years from now? >> well, we're heading toward, i think, a demographic period of real difficulty as the white majority declines. and there's -- and there's a fear of -- out in the middle of the country of this new america that's emerging that is so multicultural, multiethnic. but i do think -- once again, i'm going to be slightly optimistic here becau
double class are we. "son, we po" we could not even afford the o and the r. i had to get an education. i had the opportunity to move up. that is why i love this country. i was able to work in the steel mills. it was a good working class in cincinnati. the good work here during the summer. -- you could work there during the summer. it is a great opportunity. there are not jobs in the still mill like there used to be. tuition is 10 times what it was when i was a student. aboard mobility is the one used to be. and known charles -- and control since 1984. he is a way of life seen books that either in rage or to let me. nothing in between. we've talked many times over the years. we have sometimes argued. even only argue it is fascinating. i learned so much. you have the cream of the crop year today. we look forward to your questions as well. without further ado, i am going to pull out my little iphone now that my son as taught me how to work it and i will be doing the timing here as well. charles, you have seven minutes to respond to our question. >> i am not sure the topic of the debate is.
and things in narratives. rather than just putting one person on education to gobble the fire hoses, to put somebody and have them come up with the narrative they're going to follow or add new narrative's or subtract them but really try to explain and make sure people are enrolled because if they are not, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question. i am not thinking of any city in particular but with that kind of operation, in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange -- imagine that -- somebody who wanted -- very openly to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. just imagine if something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you to do more, to fill that void, or can't you fill the void of the newspaper? that city just out of luck? >> a couple things. first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism, the owners of the union tribune purchased the times for less than the owner sold his house for. the assets are completely collapsing in
on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment, over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue, on every core issue -- >> moderator: okay. you raised an important one. congressman dold, your votes on obamacare. you voted against it. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, i think we can agree there are some things -- >> moderator: by the way, you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare. dold: i think we got 23 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on the new set of tenures doubled. >> it didn't double. dold: it did. now after two years it is doubling, and so i do think this is wildly troubling because small businesses are looking at how can i, in essence, pay the penalty an
to not necessarily covering beats but covering narrative's. rather than just putting one person on education to try to double that entire fire house that comes at him, -- fire hose that comes at them, they can add narratives and subtract them, make sure people are involved. if they are not enrolled in those neighbor -- narratives, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question -- i am not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still -- fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north
at the expansion of the government and education. when we separated education out of health, education, and welfare. we have spent more money at education at the federal government level, money that could have been used better at the local levels. we have to look at these duplicative programs. we have got to move away from baseline budget to zero-based budget. >> the gao had a study that counted 33 agencies that are doing the same thing. we need to streamline these agencies. seven are focused on businesses and trade. let's streamline them. we have attacked medicare fraud and abuse. we need to continue to do that, in all government agencies. i spent years going into numerous fortune 500 countries -- companies looking for these inefficiencies. i plan using my government to find this week. >> can either of you give me any numbers? the department of energy? >> close to $85 billion. you are looking at a guy, never been in politics before, and i found three wasteful programs in the government. the combined savings of -- if every single member of the house was going and looking for wasteful programs, thin
across pakistan where she has been a vocal campaigner for girls' education. she was targeted by the taliban because of it. now, public anger has turned against the militants. her father who has vowed to return the family to pakistan has expressed his gratitude. >> when she stood pakistan turns and this is a turning point, which is not only my daughter, but daughter of everybody. >> reporter: doctors here at the queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham talk of her very good progress. the head wound is no longer infected and it does not appear to be any brain damage. her vision and hearing appear good, although they're still being tested and let's say she has a very good recollection of the traumatic events that brought her here. she's not forgotten her cause either. one of the first things she asked, says her father, is whether he brought her school books. a sign of how determined this young girl remains. all right, doctors do, though, say, that there is a long way for her to go. a lot of reconstructive surgery she has to have done on her head. remember, the bullet shattered her
are friends. it is real. i want, therefore, three times, you know, syrian turkish border. educate imagine how much is becoming a regional threat for the security region. the second thing i think united states past -- you're always talk about human rights supporting democracy, supporting kids rights and human rights. what about the serious? now, i really was crying when i was sitting the kids going to school for two years. and they might be terrorists. so my last comment is what is the incentive for, if you are just going to -- [inaudible] and i am sure those will not be good news for united states. >> i think one of the things that we haven't heard at all here, and yet should be uppermost in our minds is what went wrong with iraq, is what happened the day after. it's what you think about how you defeat bashar or getting to be part of a negotiated solution, fine, but i think one of the most telling comments was that, that it could end, this crisis could into more but the effects of it will linger on. you don't in the blood feuds and the killings and violence and the factions and everyone goes
, but our entire country. you will be able to vote on november 6, making a more informed and educated decision. it is my honor to introduce them to you. in the interest of time, we have asked our audience to only -- to not applaud tonight. only at the end of the bay -- of the debate and at the beginning of the debate. the former governor and senator of virginia, george allen. [applause] now, the democrat in this race, from richmond, va., a former governor of virginia, tim kaine. [applause] i think i told you we have an enthusiastic crowd. we do. thank you for agreeing to participate in this important debate and participate and put your self out there. we decided everything by the toss of a coin. the result of that, we will begin with governor kaine. 90 seconds. >> thank you for this opportunity. it is great to be back to virginia tech. i feel close to this community. we have challenges as a nation. the main one is to continue to accelerate the economy and grow jobs. in order to do that, we have to have a congress that knows how to work together. i learned some valuable lessons as mayo
... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >> schieffer: and joining us now from akron, ohio, the mayor of chicago, rahm emanuel. mr. mayor, thank you so much. and i'm never one to presume to know what the answers are before i ask the questions, but my guess is you will will have a slightly different take on events and what we just heard from senator mccain. >> very good, bob. yes. first of all, the president immediately ordered an investigation into what happened in benghazi. second, he wants to find out who's responsible. and third, he will bring them to justice, just like he brought bin laden, and he did refer to the event as a terrorist act. when mitt romney said he did. so that's number one. and the events there are a human tragedy. it's an assault on america. and as commander in chief, he took control and he said exactly what needs to be done. none of us are privy to the information. i'm not. i'm the mayor of the city of chicago. but if the
be anywhere. you know, we're all educate canned, well -- connected. well, mostly. any device that's on your phone, your computer, in the future your refrigerator, anything that's on the internet you can get to from basically anywhere. so that's one of the things that makes defense difficult, right? so you don't have to just defend against your neighbor, you have to defend against the guy in belarus, so it's a whole different program. >> host: well, robert o'hara described you as a good guy hacker, a white hat hacker. what does that mean, and what's the motive of some of the black hat hackers? >> guest: okay. so the white hat, the good guy hackers like was explained, so, um, we're the guys who, you know, we develop skills to do the same thing that bad guys can do. so we can break into computers, but i instead of -- instead of stealing information and causing problems, we, you know, tell everyone what we did, try to work with vendors to make their products more secure, you know, give talks about security and how to make it better. and so we're -- while we can break in and do harm, we don't. w
'm talking about retired rising. -- about re prior testing. that is education, and for structur and resources. infrastructure and research. helping families it had once again. and help us in the longer term terry >> -- longer term. >> what is job one for you? >> the first step is to balance the budget. we will be in a fiscal of this year it is how born here in milwaukee is $51,000 in debt. our whole budget is heading toward some sort of fiscal of us unless we do something. congress has not crossed a budget in 3 1/2 years. when i was governor, i've passed the budget every year. we created 742,000 jobs. with the congresswoman has said about me is a figment of her imagination. i was a present chairman of [unintelligible] , grading $700. first of about the budget that the economy moving. there are 22 million individuals underemployed or unemployed. i will create -- make things happen. billed the state. that is what i've known for. that is what i will do. >> give me an example in terms of jobs would you would see yourself sponsoring immediately that you think would improve economic fortunes for pe
an all-in strategy and invest in training and education and leave the congress on both sides. we're going to do this, but i'm going to take the weight. if there are tough decisions, blame them on me. that is what executive leadership is about. that is what the president is determined to do after the election. he has sort of hinted about it. i would talk about it. governor romney, who is a problem solver, he would be inclined to do the same thing. people respond to leadership. the paralysis that you see just needs a good idea, and figs in the debt is a great idea. have a little tough leadership. if we can get both components, we can get things done. >> i want to throw out a couple of datapoint. the generation gap is significant. senior turnout is much greater. they're much more enthusiastic than they were four years ago. voting among seniors could be a very significant impact on the outcome of the campaigns. second, when you talk about leadership and where the voters are, one of the common complaint in this town are -- is that voters are the problem. they will not accept any cuts. that is
education fund thinks the candidates for participating in this debate. we are grateful for their continued partnership and commitment to informing citizens. voters do not need a valid photo i.d., only those that are newly registered voters must show proof read -- residency. learn more about candidates at smartvoter.org. help to make democracy work, vote on tuesday, november 6. thank you for watching. >> president obama this afternoon visited the fema headquarters in washington, participating in the briefing with a number of governors from virginia, maryland, delaware, and other states. he then spoke with reporters. >> keep up the good work. appreciate it. keep it up. >> good afternoon, everyone. obviously, obviously all of the -- all the start -- across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. my first message is to all people across the eastern seaboard, the midlantic going north. you need to take this very seriously and follow the instructions of your state and local officials, because they are going to be providing you with the best advice in terms of how
and prioritize things like social security, medicare, and education. that's why i support a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. >> the race to succeed the retiring new mexico senator is just one of the key house, senate, and governor's races you can follow on c-span, c-span radio, and at c-span.org. >> more campaign 2012 coverage next, to milwaukee, wisconsin. where friday the former governor tommy thompson faced off against u.s. congresswoman tammy baldwin, in their third and final debate for the senate seat left open by retiring senator herb kohl. it is a tossup. last about an hour. it's courtesy of wisn tv in milwaukee. >> hello, everyone. welcome to our conversation with the candidates. we are joined by tammy baldwin and tommy thompson. thanks to both of you for participating. >> my daughter. >> i worked as a journalist and served as a fellow in law and public policy here at the university. the rules for tonight's discussion are simple. we have asked candidates to join us for conversation about the role of government in our lives and the direction of our country. we have aske
. the value of service to the country, the value of stewardship of the land, family, and education, actually. people who i talked to said education is central to who we are in iowa. those of some of the basic values. i think i heard congressman king say the same thing. i do not think we are that far apart on what we would agree on in terms of what our basic values are. >> he accuse you of being a carpetbagger. what is your response to that? >> all of these towns, i represent everything in this district for eight years. all of the towns and people in them feel -- >> as iowa's first lady? >> yes. i travelled the country, traveling and representing people in the whole state, certainly in this district. i represented everybody in the district. 40%. i represent the values of this district. >> mrs. vilsack, do you feel comfortable about some of the things portrayed in the ad -- would you like to have them along your side campaigning for you? talking about. >> the humane society, their views on pork production, would you like to have been campaigning alongside you? >> i have not taken money from th
's the national leader in education and he did some things i've caller:ed in my plan for the nation. number one he makes sure schools are evaluated so you know how well a school is doing. they get graded. he makes sure the parents are able to send a child to a school of their choice. i'm going to take federal dollars and instead of giving them to the schools i'm going to have them follow the student so parents can choose the school. number four doesn't sound to a lot of people like it has a lot to do with jobs but it does. it relates to debt and deficits which and that is if you're an sbe preneurothinking of risking your live ever life savings to start a business or build a factry, if you think america is on the road to greece or italy or spain, you're less likely to invest in america. and right now we spend a trillion more than we take in. it's bad for the economy. . i think it's immoral for us to pass on debt like that to our kids and i will get america on track to a balanced budget. [applause] and number five, is to be a champion of small business, help small business grow and thrive. by the wa
all the news, the prince. the publishing stories that have public interest and educate the public. wikileaks by contrast is all about just disclosing secrets. you know. the press, typical press, investigative journalism, that is how they get their permission wikileaks sets up internet lockboxes all designed to collect possible automation in a way that can scrub the laws. so you have these distinctions between methods and the missions of wikileaks versus traditional press such that if the government decides to bring a case in wikileaks i have some confidence that the rest of the press will not be chilled. but, obviously that is a tough line to draw. and it is getting tougher and tougher with more immediate, more news being disseminated by sort of these alternative routes , bloggers and the like. >> so let's do one more question here and then we will take some from the audience and a couple of minutes. so picking up, again, on the judge's comments about -- about some extent of over classification or misclassification and also on cans discussion of the hard issues that are posed by t
. and we're trying to contribute further to the education. the post has a conference with some very senior former intelligence officials, hackers and others, at the end of the month, and they can find out more at washingtonpost.com. it will be open to the public and will be a fascinating day because we will have, as i said, people directly involved in helping establish policy, formerly running, for example, the nsa, cyber command, getting together to discuss these issues and going through some scenarios. like i said, that will be at the end of the month at the washington post. >> robert o'harrow's series in the loss to pose is linked to our site at c- span.org/thecommunicators if you would like to read for yourself. charlie miller is at a computer researcher and twitter employee, also known as a good guy hacker, joining us from st. louis. mr. o'harrow, thank you for being on "the communicators." >> thank you for having me. >> tomorrow on "washington journal," we look at early voting with michael mcdonald. then we look to the battleground state of pennsylvania. first, the state's political
for making it better. may i know that we are trying to contribute further to the education and the post post has a conference with some very senior former intelligence officials, hackers and others coming up at the end of the month and they can find out more at "washington post".com. >> host: will it be up into the public? >> guest: it will be open to the public.
a five-point plan but they have nothing underneath it, no plan to revietallize our education system, no plan other than to give the oil companies everything they're asked for including continued subsidies but nothing for new energy. and then of course the biggest whopper is they're going to take care of our deficits when they propose $7 trillion in new spending between tax cuts for the well think and the pentagon spending for which they have no plan to pay. so saying you have a plan for the future doesn't mean you do. what he has is the one-point plan the president has been talking about, which is the same plan that got us into this mess in the first place. >> the main argument they're making, he did it in his opening remarks in the last debate and the closing remarks, is that more people are unemployed, more people are on foot stamps, more people are in poverty right now than they were four years ago, why re-elect a president who has a dismal record they say like this. >> the reason they're behind in this race, wolf, is because that's been their mantra from the beginning. everybody
] at a time when he's cutting the education budget by 11%, the transport budget by 15% and the police budget by 20%, how can he even be giving up on a cut in the e.u. budget before the negotiations have been in. >> we have to make cuts in budgets because we're dealing with a record debt and deficit. [cheers and applause] if he wants to talk about consistency, perhaps he can explain why his own members of the european parliament voted against the budget freeze in -- [inaudible] last year? perhaps he can explain why the socialist group in the european parliament that he's such a proud member of are calling not for an increase in the budget, not for a freeze in the budget, but for a 200 billion euro increase in the budget, and while they're at it they want to get rid of the rest of the british rebate. is that his ?oil. >> ed milliband. >> it's good to see -- it's good to see -- it's good to see the crimson tide -- >> order, order. government back benches including ministers, apparently approaching maturity. they've really got -- [laughter] no, i dare not. they've got to tackle their behavioral
of investing in education and development of future capabilities, tactics, techniques, and procedures. we have to invest in that going forward. >> could i do a short follow-up? what does that approach imply for the royal army civilians and contractors? do they become diminished -- for the army civilians and contractors? do they become diminished? but they might in terms of numbers, but they will still play a role -- >> they might in terms of numbers, but it will still play a role. >> and how do you incorporate the planning of what those numbers need to be, particularly on the contractor side? >> you want to have the right balance. again, contractors provide us with its unique capabilities that we simply do not have. that is what they will focus on. we have department of army civilians that will provide continuity and consistency that we need. then you need our military members in order to provide us with experience, expertise, and frankly sometimes, just the validity of what we are trying to do based on their experiences. that is where and try to capture the right mix. right now, it is overbal
it out. then president obama said well, you know, a college education will earn a million dollars, that study, sway never asked a follow-up, never came close to asking a follow-up and only would say uh-huh, thank you. he was kind of cowed by being with the president. >> the president doing morning joe, spent a couple days with the morning anchor. brian williams got extraordinary access for rock center and nbc news. >> you know what a fan i am of rock center with chelsea clinton and the bowing anchor where he bowed the president. in fairness, i thought he did a good job deconstructing what the campaign team was setting up, when they went to the fair in iowa, put hay bails around two men in suits, brian laughed about it, pulled it out, said folks, they put this here so you know we're in iowa. he did a good job, but didn't follow-up on questions. given what he did he deserves credit. >> the attack on libya he could have followed up. >> yes. >> mitt romney hasn't been on the shows since he did kelly ripa's show. not seeing him talk underwear on mtv. does it put him at a disadvantage?
are investing in education and development of future capabilities and procedures and we have to invest them -- invest in them as we go forward. >> can i do a short follow up on that? how does that approach applied to the army today and the contractor support? they become diminished as part of that. >> i think potentially they might a little bit. >> in terms of numbers. >> yeah in terms of numbers but they will still play a role. >> how do you incorporate into the planning what those numbers need to be particularly on the contractor side? >> i think what we do is first trade-offs trade-offs work in this form and what they want to do is have the right balance because again contractors provide unique capabilities that we simply don't have. that is what they will focus on. we have civilians giving us the continuity and consistency we need and then we need our military members to provide us experience, expertise and frankly sometimes just the validity of what we are trying to do based on their experiences. i think that is what we are trying to capture. what i'm saying now is that his overbalance
in the brown v. board of education 1964. strom thurmond is the recordholder to stay at the longest one-man filibuster. 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today is one of the last of the jim crow demagogues and he was. he was not. but we forgot is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what i mean by that? as a sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs, industry, resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest, to the south and southwest in the post-world war ii period. southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving from you and from the federal government to build military installations that attend the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. states like mississippi, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population an
most severe threat to survival. what about someone who never got a college education-who failed in business-who was an ally of a thoroughly corrupt political machine? well, history has been pretty kind to harry truman, whose post-war leadership put europe back on its feet, and who combined strength and judgment. and was it really likely that an ex-actor, who launched his political career with a speech on behalf of one of the most unsuccessful candidates in history, would win two landslide victories and remain as the single most revered figure in his party? even some liberal historians now give ronald reagan high marks for helping to end the cold war. and it's not as though we know what experience will best serve in the oval office. no one knew the congress better than lyndon johnson. he'd spent his life there. but johnson saw the world through that prism. he could not comprehend, for instance, that north vietnam's leaders did not want a hydroelectric dam-they wanted a country, and would fight for it as long as it took to win. do you look for early clues? franklin roosevelt's rel
i never thought of acquiring rank in the profession i was educated for, namely the military. yet it came with two grades higher prefix to the rank of general officer for me. i certainly never had either ambition or taste for political life, yet are was twice president of the united states. one of the striking things to me on writing this story was observing how grant did and mostly did not change personally as he became this world historical figure. when the civil war began, grant was living in illinois. one thing after another had failed for him. he failed as a farmer and failed in selling real estate and failed selling insurance. he finally had to fall back on longstanding offer from his father who really thought ulysses grant had very few gifts at all. and he went to work for his younger brother in the family leather store. he was full the resigned to life of mediocrity. if the war had not come, the world never would have heard of ulysses grant. he was not one who had any burning ambition. if he had not been essentially handed the presidency, it never would have occurred to hi
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